Russia: Scream of anguish from Greek students

Greek students in Russia, the country that has been isolated from the international community and due to the ongoing conflict in Ukraine one package of sanctions follows another. With the gap between the West and Russia widening and the Cold War climate evident, students from our country are experiencing the brutality of the rupture in the Kremlin’s relations with Europe, they report being victimized abusive behaviors in Russia, while they cry out in agony and try in every way to return to their homeland.

After his dramatic speech Vladimir Putinwith which he declared status partial conscription, the disruption in Russia, which has blocked air travel, is evident. Amidst the wave of young Russians fleeing the war, the ticket to get out of Russia has risen to a desperate level.

As a result of this, the students from Greece have been trapped in Russia, which reminds War zoneand fearing the outcome of the war to send – according to protothema.gr – a letter to the Ministry of Education in order to be able to continue their studies in Greek universities and that the labors of so many years are not wasted.

The Golgotha ​​of moving from Russia, due to the sudden jump in prices, is described by student Myrto Telopoulou.

“After the latest measures taken by Europe against Russia’s hostile moves, there are no longer any direct flights, with the passage through Istanbul “easier” due to more frequent flights, which is doubtful in the near future, as Greece’s relations – Turkey are more tense than ever and the bad outcome of things is a realistic and possible scenario.

Myrto Telopoulou

Not to mention the ticket prices (via Turkey for a one-way trip around €1,000, via Cairo and Serbia from €1,000 and above) that isolate and prohibit the Greek, European student from returning to his homeland during holidays and vacations and to see his own” states in particular dental student.

“The reason I am sending you this letter is the inability to continue my studies in Russia, due to the war between Ukraine and Russia and my request to transfer to a Greek equivalent university” writes, among other things, in her letter to the Ministry of Education..

Another case of a Greek student who tries by all means to return to his homeland to enter a zone of normality is that of Vladimirou Katsikidis which is really shocking. He fears that the Russian border will be closed in the near future.

The anxiety of the third-year general medicine student of his State Medical University Krasnodar is expressed in the following words: “All airports in southwestern Russia are closed, including the one in Krasnodar. This combined with the elimination of direct flights from EU states makes the cost of flights prohibitive (around 800 euros in my case). Due to the partial conscription declared on September 21st, flights are even more difficult to find. It is very likely that the country will close its borders in the near future.”

Vladimir Katsikidis

“My problem and the reason I am asking for help is that it is becoming difficult and dangerous for me to return to Russia due to the state of war in which the country finds itself. The declaration of partial conscription is only a sample of what is to come. There were some who tried to downplay the situation of Greek students in Russia, saying that there is no war there. That can no longer be said. Russia is at war and we students will lose our studies. That is why we ask that our request for a transfer to the corresponding Greek universities be considered so that the efforts of so many years are not lost” continues the medical student, underlining the criticality of these unprecedented – for modern times – moments.

“Don’t go to Greece because you will be treated by people like him”

It focuses on the economic and social difficulties that life in Russia now brings for a European, for a Greek, after the punitive measures against the Kremlin.

“Shortly after the war began, Russia was excluded from the SWIFT Interbank System. As a result of this, the transfer of remittances from Greece is impossible, while the vast majority of money sending services have stopped operating. As you can see, survival in Russia alone became extremely difficult. Due to the support shown by Greece in the war-torn Ukraine, I was faced with bad attitudes from some fellow students and professors of my university. One of the most intense incidents was in the general surgery class. The professor asked me to answer a question orally, as he did to all my fellow students at that time. When I got stuck on a Russian word, the professor could have ignored it. He would give me the grade that he himself considered appropriate and end there. Instead, he decided to address the class to everyone, point to me and say: “Don’t go to Greece because you will be treated by people like him”…

Explaining the reasons why he went to study in Russia, Vladimir states the following: “Studies in Russia for me and my family it was an economical and safe choice. Economical due to the cost of tuition and life in general. Certainly because we had acquaintances who had studied there before and knew the procedures. I started the first year, during which I had to interrupt my studies temporarily for family reasons. From that point on, nothing unexpected happened. We thus arrive at June ’22 when the situation inside Russia, after the so-called “Special Military Operation” against Ukraine, brought me to an impasse and forced me to interrupt my studies for the second time.”

“We ask to go back”

Vladimiros’ concern is shared by DA, also a medical student. “The war in Ukraine changed everything. Unfortunately, the sanctions against Russia have greatly affected the lives of all Greek students. So how can you continue studying if you can’t live, since your family can’t even send you money? For this reason we ask to return to our country so that we can complete our studies” points out in particular.

E.P. also requests his transfer to a Greek university. who attends a public university in Saint Petersburg. “It is my first month in the country and the truth is that the current political situation prevailing at the international level greatly affects my livelihood. The problems of transferring money, moving and living smoothly for a Greek student in Russia are very real. All Greek students here are faced with these problems. We request the transfer of our studies to the Greek universities, in our homeland”.

Angelos Syrigos: Money will be sent to the students in Russia through the Greek consulates

His reaction was immediate Ministry of Education to the appeals for help of Greek students in Russia that was published by protothema.gr.

As the Deputy Minister of Education, Angelos Syrigos, explained to ERT the main problem faced by Greeks students at Russia is sending money from their families since the country is blocked from the interbank system under sanctions after its invasion of Ukraine.

There has been an agreement with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs that the parents of these students give money to the Greek consulates in order to take the children from theresaid Mr. Wheezing in ERT.

Regarding the students’ request for mediation in order to return to Greece, Mr Undersecretary of education noted that “there is no such thing, that they turn back, since in Russia we do not have war conflicts».

THE Angel Syrigos he revealed, finally, that he is in the process of drawing up a special plan to find a solution for the approximately 12-14 students who, according to the information available to the Ministry of Education, are in Ukraine “because they are in danger as there are bombings”.

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The article is in Greek

Greece

Tags: Russia Scream anguish Greek students

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